This is the second in a three-part series on color theory.

In our last post, we introduced the concept of color theory. In that post, we introduced the color wheel and created our own color wheel using the pencils that we usually color with.

In this post, we are going to learn about color schemes and how they can help us improve the results of our coloring.

In the next post, we will learn how color values can make our coloring come to life.

Color Schemes

In this post, we will learn about color schemes and how the location of each color on the color wheel influences how each color will harmonize with other colors. We will also see how color schemes will affect the mood of your coloring.

Types of Color Schemes

There are many types of color schemes and they range from the very simple monochromatic theme to complex color tetrads. Understanding the different types of color schemes will help you create a variety of results with your coloring.

Monochromatic Color Scheme

Monochromatic Color Scheme

Monochromatic Color Scheme

A monochromatic color scheme is made up of only one color and the tints and shades of that color. To create a monochromatic color scheme, select one color from the color wheel as your base color and then mix it with black, white and gray to create a variety of tints, shades and tones around that base color.

Analogous Color Scheme

Analogous Color Scheme

Analogous Color Scheme

An analogous colors scheme is made up of 3-5 colors that sit next to one another on a wheel. Since these colors sit alongside each other on the wheel they naturally harmonize, creating a natural blend of color that we find pleasing to the eye.

 

Complementary Color Scheme

Complementary Color Scheme

Complementary Color Scheme

Complimentary colors are colors that sit directly opposite each other on the color wheel. Using complementary colors will help you to create a design that pops. Examples include red and green; blue and orange; yellow and purple; and red-orange and blue-green.

Triadic Color Scheme

Triadic Color Scheme

Triadic Color Scheme

A triadic color scheme is made up of three colors equally spaced around the the color wheel. This approach offers a balance between the contrast of a complementary color scheme and the harmony of an analogous color scheme. Often it is suggested to allow one of the colors chosen to be used more liberally in your coloring and treat the other colors as accents, this can produce a vibrant design with a nice balance.

Warm and Cool Color Schemes

Warm Color Schemes

Warm Color Scheme

Warm Color Scheme

These are colors that are so named because they’re associated with heat and warmth.

They are red-purple, red, red-orange, orange, yellow-orange, yellow, and yellow-green.

Cool Color Schemes

Cool Color Scheme

Cool Color Scheme

These colors are so called because they’re associated with the cold.

They are green, blue-green, blue, blue-purple, and purple.

Using Color Schemes

The color wheel and color schemes can be used to enhance the look of your coloring projects.  For example, mixing analogous or complementary colors to your base color can enhance your coloring and make it more interesting.

Your Turn

Pick a simple drawing and select three or four colors from one of the color schemes above. You might choose to use a complementary color scheme, or an analogous color scheme, but choose one to use to complete your drawing.

We would greatly appreciate it if you share your completed drawings in our Facebook group!

Question: Do you ever think about color schemes when you are planning a page to color?